Hundreds of thousands of people in New Mexico are exposed to the dangers of the road on a regular basis. Many take the use of a motor vehicle for granted, assuming that they will return home safe after this trip is over. However, there some cases where they will not return home and become involved in an accident.

Car accidents vary in severity, but if someone is injured, it may be wise to take note of what happened soon after the incident is over. With the memory still fresh in a person's head, testimonies and written records of what happened may be more reliable and acceptable in courts and to insurance companies.

One of the ways that people should consider presenting information about a crash is through a car accident diagram. Experts in the field of making these have noted that telling a jury about a crash with words is one thing, but combining those words with images and a sequence of events can be extremely helpful. This sort of diagram has helped many people win suits and prove claims to insurance agents, due to the clarity provided by the diagram.

One expert, who drew hundreds of them as an insurance adjuster, now uses them as an attorney when representing clients who have been involved in motor vehicle accidents. Now, they do not have to be drawn. Many digital applications can help people create their own accident diagrams-some of these programs are provided by insurance companies and can even be downloaded to a smart phone.

When creating a diagram, be sure to have someone who knows the details of the crash to go over the document. If no one else knows what happened, still consider having it proofread. In order for a diagram to be effective, it must be straightforward, truthful and correct. The validity of the diagram could be thrown off by a simple mistake such as putting the wrong names on streets.

Source: Fox Business, "Car Accident Diagrams go Digital," Barbara Marquand, Jan. 8, 2013